Original Research

Diabetic retinal detachment surgery at a central academic hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa

Mathabo Mofokeng, Mokokomadi A. Makgotloe
African Vision and Eye Health | Vol 82, No 1 | a761 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/aveh.v82i1.761 | © 2023 Mathabo Mofokeng, Mokokomadi A. Makgotloe | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 22 March 2022 | Published: 30 January 2023

About the author(s)

Mathabo Mofokeng, Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Mokokomadi A. Makgotloe, Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Tractional retinal detachment surgery outcomes are unpredictable and need to be reviewed regularly in clinical practice settings.

Aim: To describe the visual acuity and anatomical outcomes of retinal detachment surgery for diabetic tractional retinal detachment at a central academic hospital.

Setting: Johannesburg, South Africa.

Methods: This study involves a retrospective case series of patients who had surgery for diabetic tractional retinal detachment at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital between 01 January 2010 and 31 December 2014.

Results: A total of 65 patients with diabetic retinal detachment were included in this study. The study consisted of 63% (n = 41) male patients and 37% (n = 24) female patients. The mean age (± standard deviation) was 54 ± 12.2 years. Forty-four patients (68%) had tractional retinal detachment, and 21 (32%) patients had a combined tractional and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Twenty-one (32%) patients had detachments associated with vitreous haemorrhage (VH), and 39 (60%) patients had macular-involving detachments. Forty-six (71%) patients obtained vision improvement or stabilisation and reattachment of the retina, 24 (36.9%) patients had visual acuity improvement, 22 (33.9%) patients retained the same visual acuity and 19 (29.2%) patients lost vision. Fifty-five (85%) patients had successful anatomical reattachment of the retina, and 10 (15%) patients had re-detachments after surgery.

Conclusion: The majority of patients whose files were reviewed benefited from surgical intervention for diabetic tractional retinal detachment in terms of stabilisation or improvement of vision.

Contribution: Tractional detachment surgery outcomes in our setting are comparable to those from elsewhere around the world.


Keywords

Retinal; tractional detachment; African; sub-Saharan Africa; rhegmatogenous; diabetic retinopathy

Metrics

Total abstract views: 1569
Total article views: 1450


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.