Original Research

Myopia prevalence in school-aged children in Garki District of Abuja, Nigeria

Tope R. Akinbinu, Kovin S. Naidoo, Samuel O. Wajuihian
African Vision and Eye Health | Vol 81, No 1 | a657 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/aveh.v81i1.657 | © 2022 Tope R. Akinbinu, Kovin S. Naidoo, Samuel O. Wajuihian | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 31 January 2021 | Published: 30 May 2022

About the author(s)

Tope R. Akinbinu, Department of Optometry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
Kovin S. Naidoo, Department of Optometry, AVRI, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; and, Department of Optometry, Faculty of Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Samuel O. Wajuihian, Department of Optometry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Prevalence of myopia is increasing globally, hence it poses a significant public health risk due to the association of high myopia with debilitating eye disorders.

Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of myopia in school children.

Setting: The study was conducted in primary and secondary schools in Garki district, Abuja, Nigeria.

Methods: A cross-sectional, multistage, random sampling involving 1028 school children (aged 5–14 years), comprising 484 boys (47.1%) and 544 girls (52.9%), was conducted. Examination performed included visual acuities, pen torch and ophthalmoscopy examination of the anterior and posterior segments, retinoscopy under cycloplegia and subjective refraction.

Results: The prevalence of myopia (−0.50 dioptre [D] or more) in this study was 3.5%. Approximately 3.4% of the children had mild myopia (−0.50 to −3.00 D), 0.1% had moderate myopia (−3.25 D to −6.00 D) and none had high myopia. Myopia ranged from −0.50 D to −4.25 D. The mean spherical equivalent for myopia (right eye) was −1.11 D. The prevalence of hyperopia, astigmatism and amblyopia was 5.8%, 1.9% and 0.7%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence of refractive error was 11.2%.

Conclusion: The prevalence of myopia is relatively low in a sample of school children in Garki district of Abuja, Nigeria. However, the majority of myopic children in this study without spectacles (88.9%) are a cause for concern, which could reflect the low usage of refractive error services among school children in the district.


Keywords

myopia; prevalence; hyperopia; astigmatism; refractive error

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