Original Research

Impact of low vision services on the quality of life of low vision patients in Ghana

Godwin O. Ovenseri-Ogbomo, Harriette Osafo-Agyei, Ralph E.U. Akpalaba, James Addy, Elizabeth O. Ovenseri
African Vision and Eye Health | Vol 75, No 1 | a19 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/aveh.v75i1.19 | © 2016 Godwin O. Ovenseri-Ogbomo, Harriette Osafo-Agyei, Ralph E.U. Akpalaba, James Addy, Elizabeth O. Ovenseri | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 05 September 2014 | Published: 30 March 2016

About the author(s)

Godwin O. Ovenseri-Ogbomo, Department of Optometry, University of Benin, Nigeria; Department of Optometry, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
Harriette Osafo-Agyei, Ophthalmolgy Unit, Eastern Regional Hospital, Ghana
Ralph E.U. Akpalaba, Department of Optometry, University of Benin, Nigeria
James Addy, Ophthalmolgy Unit, Eastern Regional Hospital, Ghana
Elizabeth O. Ovenseri, Central Hospital, Warri, Nigeria


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Abstract

Patients’ perspectives on the impact of clinical interventions have been recognised as critical elements in patient care. Quality-of-life instruments are designed to measure these perspectives. We used the National Eye Institute’s 25-item Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI VFQ) to measure the impact of optical low vision devices on the quality of life of 22 low vision patients who obtained and were using low vision devices from a secondary low vision clinic in the Eastern Region, Ghana. The study employed a pre- and post-intervention technique. We found statistically significant improvements in measured visual acuity and NEI VFQ scores in 8 of the 10 domains evaluated. We conclude that optical low vision devices have a positive impact on the quality of life of low vision patients in Ghana.

Keywords: low vision; quality of life; visual acuity; visual impairment; Ghana


Keywords

low vision; quality of life; visual acuity; visual impairment; Ghana

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